Mulligatawny Soup with home-made yoghurt flatbreads

7.9.16


Morning all. Well I am back from my whirlwind trip to Brisbane (more on that soon), and already into the normal swing of things with regular jobs lined up for Fairfax, Cuisine and Dish as well as some exciting collaborations, even with a (hold on to your hat) competition coming up! I am feeling very lucky to be busy doing so much work that I enjoy - to be able to work in a creative way, cooking, writing and photographing is such a privilege (and occasionally a hideous nightmare if I'm feeling stressed and my creativity flies out the window). Fortunately when things don't work the first time I have the bloody-minded persistence inherited from my Dutch ancestors to try and try again until I get it right.

Happily this was a recipe (created for Fairfax) that came together perfectly, and with a flavour profile that I really love. It is another of those anglo-indian dishes like smoked fish kedgeree which was invented to marry Indian spices with English palates. My version is a bit gruntier that many you will find - the combination of spices gives a gentle heat to the kumara, chicken and coconut milk, the rice brings added texture, the apple brings a little sweetness along with the mango chutney and then you have the tart creaminess of the yoghurt, fresh herbaceous parsley and crunchy toasted slivered almonds to finish it off! The yoghurt flatbreads are ridiculously easy to make, and because the soup is almost stew-like you can easily use the soft bread to scoop it up. Actually, if you want a more soupy consistency, just feel free to add the extra stock. There is also the option to thicken it with lentils instead of rice if you fancy, and it is one of those soups that, like so many, tastes better the day after you make it, so it's a great one to make on Saturday for a snuggy Sunday night in :)

Before I get up (in bed writing this as usual), not much else is happening, the house is once again super quiet now that Will and Henry are back in Melbourne and Rich is back at uni in Wellington (running and going to the gym and getting some jolly fine marks - whaaaat?). I find myself having to crank my music up to avoid the weird feeling of having to tiptoe around the house, but I'm sure I will get used to it again quickly - any waaaay - back to the routine of walking, yoga, big baths and dinners for one...and lots of recipe writing to be done :)








2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons cumin seeds
1 large stick of celery, finely chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
1 small leek, trimmed and finely chopped
1 small carrot, finely chopped
1 orange kumara, peeled and cut into about 1 1/2 cm cubes
1 granny smith apple, peeled and cut into about 1 1/2 cm cubes
1 tablespoon tomato puree
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon garam masala
2 teaspoons curry powder
1 400g tin crushed and sieved tomatoes
5-6 cups chicken stock
1 400ml tin coconut milk
500g chicken breasts ( 2 large)
½ cup basmati rice
½ cup cream
½ cup Greek yoghurt
½ cup apricot or mango chutney
1/3 cup finely chopped parsley
1/3 cup toasted flaked almonds

Heat the olive oil in a large heavy based saucepan and cook the cumin seeds for 30 seconds. Add the celery, onion, leek and carrot, season with salt and pepper, and cook over a medium heat for 10 minutes. Add the kumara, apple, tomato puree, spices and crushed tomatoes. Cook for 5 minutes then add the chicken stock and bring to a boil. Add the coconut milk and reduce the heat to a simmer then add the chicken breasts. Cook for 10 minutes, then remove the chicken. Simmer the soup for 30 minutes then add the rice and cook for a further 20 minutes. At this point you can shred the chicken and add it back into the soup with the cream, or put the whole chicken breasts back into the soup and refrigerate it for up to two days before serving – to do so, reheat the soup with the whole chicken breasts in it, before removing them, and shredding them, then adding them back in. To serve, spoon a dollop of yoghurt and chutney on top, and sprinkle over parsley and almonds. Serves 6-8



Yoghurt flatbreads:
2 cups self raising flour plus extra to dust bench
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 ¼ cups Greek natural yoghurt
2 tablespoons milk
1 teaspoon olive oil
2 cloves garlic crushed
2 tablespoons melted butter
1 tablespoon very finely chopped parsley

Sift flour and baking powder into a stand mixer and add the salt. Add the yoghurt, milk, olive oil and garlic, and mix until smooth (this can also be done by hand-kneading for3-4 minutes). Tip out onto a well-floured bench and knead a little more so that the mixture is not sticky. Roll into a 48cm long sausage and cut into 10 equal sections. Roll each piece into a ball and leave to sit for 10 minutes. Roll the balls out and dry-fry in a medium hot pan for about a minute each side, until they are puffed and golden. Mix the butter and parsley and brush lightly over flatbreads while hot. 




10 comments :

  1. This looks delicious Sarah! Would it still work without the chicken (if I made it for H)? Or should it stay as a carnivorous treat for me alone? Haha. Hope you are well!

    Will x

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    1. Hi Will! Hm - I think it might need that contrasting texture to make it really work, you could possibly use some firm tofu, if he likes the sound of that? I am posting a vego recipe today too! Take care, I hear you're under the weather :( xx

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  2. Made this last night using leftover chopped roast chicken. Bloody delicious. Makes a huge amount, my pot was big but not big enough.

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    1. Yay, I'm so glad you liked it, great thinking with the roast chicken...more leftovers?! :)

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  3. Just cooked this and licked my bowl clean - delicious! However my flatbreads looked very different than your photo - the deep frying made them brown all over. Yours look quite different - did you use a different cooking technique than stated?
    Many thanks!
    JP

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    1. Hi! I'm so glad you enjoyed the soup - um the flatbreads it says to dry fry - not deep fry...so that actually means in a pan with no oil. Did they taste OK!? :)

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    2. Oh dear! Would help if I read the instructions properly! Too funny .... They were yummy but more like a donut which I didn't think was quite right. Thanks for clarifying and will put my specs on next time!

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    3. As long as they were yummy - lets call it an experiment! :)

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  4. How would you add lentils? Dried red lentils? I have already made this and it was amazing! But thought I would try giving it ago with the addition!

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    1. Hi Karyn - yes dried split red lentils. Just substitute them for the rice, and add at the same stage of cooking but cook a further 4-5 minutes to ensure the lentils are cooked through. Let me know how you get on! :)

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